David A. Roberts

David A. Roberts

Falling asleep several times a day (even while eating), losing balance, taking many pills all during the day, night-time hallucinations, becoming trapped in recliners, pain and tenseness of back muscles – such was my life with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Having had it for eight years, I was getting weaker, slower, and more bent over. Frequently, I used a cane. Covering the 200 feet from my house to my barn required at least two stops to rest. Rarely did I even get there to work on my hobby of restoring antique tractors.

In September of 2011, I was introduced to healthy chocolate. I started eating it, and eventually began to notice changes: more energy, less pain, and fewer sleep attacks. I felt like resuming my tractor hobby activities.

On December 1st, I fell from the step ladder and hit the pavement. It was not my first fall; I had almost gotten used to falling because of the PD. This fall, however, was different. The next morning, x-rays confirmed that the shoulder was indeed broken. First one doctor, and then three other orthopedic doctors, came up with the same diagnosis.

Two weeks later, the doctor said “It is healing nicely.” Two more weeks and the doctor said “It has healed nicely.”

Six weeks after the fall, I visited a new specialist for a follow-up. After reading his new MRI, he said “I see no evidence of a break. It really should still show up on the MRI, but there is nothing there!” Could it rather be that the healthy chocolate healed the bone to be like new? I believe so.

I continue to see my neurologist. He, too, sees a marked improvement in my overall performance. Together, we have successfully reduced my PD meds. I feel better; I have less pain. I have more energy; I have better balance. I can work on my tractors, and even mow several times a week. I am planning to put out a garden.

Oh yes, I can now jog to the barn.

I, David A. Roberts, am a retired physics professor at Milligan College and a retired minister, both jobs in Johnson City, TN. PD forced me into early retirement. However, this year, I am again able to enjoy occasional opportunities to speak to classes and congregations.